Category Archives: Trip Reports

Black Butte, Siskiyou County, California

Trip date: 10/16/14

Black Butte is a dacite dome volcano that is just north of the city of Mount Shasta, sitting alongside Interstate 5. The summit tops out at 6,358 feet. Having been born in Mount Shasta and lived in Weed for the first five years of my life, and spending time over the years with various relatives still in the area (my parents moved back to area 10 years ago), I have always wanted to climb Black Butte. Frankly, I don’t know what took me so long.

Black Butte topo map
Topo map of Black Butte. As seen from the contours, Black Butte is a classic cone shaped volcano.

The trailhead is on the east side of the mountain. Driving north out Mount Shasta up the Everett Memorial you come to sign directing you west to the Black Butte trailhead. It’s a 3.3 mile drive on a decently maintained Forest Service road to the trailhead. I got there about 7:15 am. No one else there. It was 44 degrees outside, with a 10 mph gusts of wind. All in all, not a bad morning to make the hike. The first quarter mile of the hike is in trees, but when you pop out, and look up at the side of the mountain, it’s imposing. The slope is chunks of broken dacite, at a 45 degree angle. Basically you loop around the mountain counterclockwise from east to west side of the mountain, then the trail turns and goes back east until you come to a few little switchbacks near the top. A lot of the trail is scree, but you can move fast. Once you get near the top, it flattens out somewhat. The last 50 feet or so to the summit, where the foundation of the old fire lookout is, is a scramble. It was a bit windy on top, but still breathtaking. Mount Shasta looms to east and Mount Eddy to the west. It was cloudy and cold on top, so I didn’t linger too long. I couldn’t find a summit register, and I didn’t bring anything up to use as one.

  • DSCN0118 web DSCN0118 web Trailhead and parking.
  • DSCN0119 web DSCN0119 web The trail starts out amongst tall pines and cedars.
  • DSCN0121 web DSCN0121 web After about a quarter mile, the trail breaks out of the trees and the scree mountainside is clearly visible.
  • DSCN0122 web DSCN0122 web Looking east at Mount Shasta.
  • DSCN0126 web DSCN0126 web Looking down at Interstate 5 just south of Weed.
  • DSCN0127 web DSCN0127 web Looking east at Mount Eddy
  • DSCN0128 web DSCN0128 web About half way up you encounter this sign. Duh!
  • DSCN0132 web DSCN0132 web Black Butte is formed by a series of dacite eruptions, which push below the older plugs, breaking through them, and pushing them aside. As you get nearer the top, you are climbing a younger event. The wall of rocks in this photo is the remains of an older eruption.
  • DSCN0134 web DSCN0134 web Wire mesh screen to hold back a rockfall along the trail.
  • DSCN0140 web DSCN0140 web Looking down on lower peaks formed by older eruptive events.
  • DSCN0141 web DSCN0141 web The foundation of the Forest Service fire lookout tower that once stood on the summit.
  • DSCN0145 web DSCN0145 web Mount Shasta from the top of Black Butte.
  • DSCN0160 web DSCN0160 web Looking upslope towards the summit. The slop must approach 50 degrees.
     

I made the trip up in 2 hours, and back done in 1 1/2. My elevation gain going up was 1,807 feet.  I met a lone hiker on the way down, but that was it for human contact.

Geology facts: Dacite is a gooey form of lava that generally flows very slowly.

The word dacite comes from Dacia, a province of the Roman Empire which lay between the Danube River and Carpathian Mountains (now modern Romania and Moldova) where the rock was first described. Lassen Peak is made of dacite, and is one of the largest plug domes in the world. The famous plug of Mount Saint Helens is also dacite, as are most of the lavas of Kīlauea.

References & further reading

Wikipedia: Black Butte (Siskiyou County, California)

summitpost.org: Black Butte (CA)

 

 

California Road Trip, October 2014

Trip date: 10/11/14-10/21/14

Eloise and I hit the open road to see family in Mount Shasta and Sacramento, California. In those 11 days, we drove 2,444.2 miles, with stops in:

  • Casa Grande, Arizona
    • We started the trip out with a delightful meal at the highly rated Feli’s Cuban Kitchen in Casa Grande. Eloise’s dinner was especially tasteful and artfully presented (flounder with mango and pineapple)
  • Palm Desert, California
  • Merced, California
  • Weed/Mount Shasta, California (3 nights)
    • I hiked to the top of Black Butte, an extinct dacite dome volcano just north of the City of Mount Shasta on the east side of Interstate 5. A trip report and photoset for the hike is posted on this site, as well as at hikearizona.com
    • Culinary highlights included Mom’s cooking, a nice family dinner at the Best Western Tree House Inn in Mount Shasta, a late night snack at the Black Bear Diner (Mount Shasta), and Hi-Lo Café in Weed for breakfast
  • Folsom, California (2 nights)
    • We had dinner with our son and one of Eloise’s brothers at a wonderful restaurant in Auburn, California, Carpe Vino. Among us we had fresh popcorn in melted black truffle butter, muscovy duck breast (farro, butternut squash, purslane, seared onion, huckleberry), niman ranch bistro filet (chanterelles, pole beans, fingerling potato, black garlic soubise), and skuna bay salmon (sunchokes, fuji apple, brussels sprouts, dill, apple must brown butter). For dessert, 3 out of 4 of us had chocolate profiteroles,  which were walnut ice cream balls wrapped in caramel and walnut streusel.  Simply unbelievable. The service was outstanding.
    • I bagged a couple of highpoints in the area: Carpenter Hill, which is the Sacramento County highpoint, and a small hill in neighboring El Dorado Hills, Peak 1161. Click on the names to go to trip reports at hikearizona.com
  • Monrovia, California
    2014-10-19 15.16.01 web
    Nectar of the gods
    • The drive from Folsom to Monrovia included a stop in Atwater at the Foster’s Freeze. Those of you unfamiliar with California drive-in cuisine, Foster’s is a DQ-like chain. I had been saving my calorie budget for an extra larger chocolate malt, with extra malt. Later I found out that this Foster’s Freeze was featured in Pulp Fiction(which I have not seen), where apparently Bruce Willis runs Ving Rhames over in the parking lot.
  • Yuma, Arizona
    • An easy day’s drive with a couple of stops along the Salton Sea, where we had never been. It’s an impressive body of water, dramatic with it’s sea to desert interface. I would consider camping here sometime during the offseason – none of the campgrounds along any campers in them, save one or two here or there. Solitude abounded. We stopped at the North Shore Beach & Yacht Club along State Route 111, a county recreation facility that once was a marina and resort for Hollywood types. There we watched pelicans, egrets and other birds, while enjoying the pleasant autumn sun and sound o the water lapping the shore.
    •  I spent a couple hours of the morning before we drove to Tucson exploring Yuma and taking pictures of trains crossing the Colorado River next to Interstate 8. We hit the road about noon, stopping in Dateland to buy dates. I’ve always been fascinated by abandoned places, especially abandoned airfields, so I remembered that there were several old WWII training fields in the area. One was back west a couple of miles on the south side of the interstate. So we headed there, and as we crossed the adjacent railroad tracks, we came across signs proclaiming “Barry M Goldwater Firing Range : Do Not Enter : Live Fire Range, yada, yada, yada”. I pondered ignoring the sign for a few moments, I mean the airfield was just another quarter mile down the road, and not an A-10 or F-35 to be seen. Well, wisdom prevailed, and I turned around – only to see a Border Patrol agent coming from the direction of the airfield 30 seconds later. An encounter with any federal agent would not have been good. But that’s ok, because just on the other side of Interstate 8 is Dateland Field, another abandoned WWII training field, so I was able to stop there. Passing Gila Bend, I got a good look at the Sand Tank Mountains, part of the Sonora Desert National Monument. It looks like a fascinating area to explore, and I’ve put it on my bucket list. There’s a great series of trip reports about this area by Desert Mountaineer.
  • DSCN0042 web DSCN0042 web The Tom Mix Memorial on Arizona State Route 79 north of Oracle Junction
  • DSCN0049 web DSCN0049 web Farmland near Florence, Arizona
  • DSCN0046 web DSCN0046 web Cotton fields, Florence, Arizona
  • DSCN0050 web DSCN0050 web Feli's Cuban Kitchen, Casa Grande, Arizona
  • DSCN0052 web DSCN0052 web Feli's Cuban Kitchen
  • DSCN0057 web DSCN0057 web Flounder with mango and pineapple, Feli's Cuban Kitchen
  • DSCN0064 web DSCN0064 web Heading west out of the Phoenix metroplex at sunset
  • DSCN0070 web DSCN0070 web Wind turbines outside of Palm Springs, California
  • DSCN0074 web DSCN0074 web Cottonwoods along California State Route 138
  • DSCN0077 web 2 DSCN0077 web 2
  • DSCN0078 web DSCN0078 web Amtrak cab car "Mount Shasta" heading north, Merced, California
  • DSCN0080 web DSCN0080 web Southbound freight on the BNSF line, Merced, California
  • DSCN0083 web DSCN0083 web Local BNSF crew setting out freight cars
  • DSCN0092 web DSCN0092 web SW1200 switch engine at the Foster Farms Collier Road plant
  • DSCN0117 web DSCN0117 web City of Mount Shasta below its namesake
  • DSCN0101 web DSCN0101 web Mount Shasta from the northwest side
  • DSCN0155 web DSCN0155 web The Shastina cone of Mount Shasta
  • DSCN0110 web DSCN0110 web Weed, California
  • DSCN0105 web DSCN0105 web Switch engine at Roseburg Lumber Products in Weed, California
  • DSCN0115 web DSCN0115 web The Sacramento River, Dunsmuir, California
  • DSCN0161 web DSCN0161 web Black Butte, just north of Mount Shasta. Black Butte is an extinct dacite dome volcano.
  • DSCN0207 web DSCN0207 web Locomotive turntable replica, downtown Folsom, California
  • DSCN0211 web DSCN0211 web A bar sign in Auburn, California
  • IMG_1852 A web IMG_1852 A web On the east side of the Salton Sea, California, looking west
  • IMG_1856 web IMG_1856 web Pelicans, Salton Sea
  • DSCN0223 web DSCN0223 web An eastbound freight train crosses the Colorado River at Yuma, Arizona
  • DSCN0224 web DSCN0224 web Balwin steam locomotive SP 2521 on display in Yuma.
  • DSCN0227 web DSCN0227 web Inside of the cab of SP 2521
  • DSCN0218 bw web DSCN0218 bw web Abandoned train station, Fort Yuma-Quechan Indian Reservation, which straddles the California/Arizona state line at Yuma.
  • DSCN0233 web DSCN0233 web One of the former runways of the WWII Army Air Corps training field Dateland Field, Dateland, Arizona
  • DSCN0231 web DSCN0231 web Abandoned water tower, used for steam locomotives along the former Southern Pacific Railroad line, just east of Dateland, Arizona
     

 

A Drive Around The Rincon Mountains

Trip date: 9/27/14

The dichotomy of urbanization and wide open spaces in Southern Arizona has always fascinated me. Within minutes of the hustle and bustle of Tucson, you can find yourself in wide open desert terrain, with an endless view to the horizon; on top of a mountain wilderness, surrounded by towering conifer forests; or in the middle of rural ranchlands and farms, looking more like California’s Central Valley or a Midwest farming state. No more is this apparent than in a drive around the Rincon Mountains east of Tucson.

Around The Rincons map
Our route around the Rincon Mountains. Click on image to enlarge.

I’ve been in Tucson for 10 years, and have yet to drive from start to finish Redington Road, or circumnavigate either the Catalinas or the Rincons. I had mentioned to my buddy Rob a few weeks ago that I wanted to accomplish these trips, now that I had gotten my Expedition road trip and somewhat off road ready. We decided on this past Saturday to make the trip, with the objective of getting the lay of the land and scouting out stuff for further exploration, as well as taking a few photos along the way. We met at my house on the Eastside and left at 8:20 am. We had a full take of gas, water, ice, donuts, charged batteries for everything, and no deadline to get back. Some clouds floated in the sky ahead, but nothing threatening, so we forged ahead. Since it was a gorgeous morning with relatively low temps, I thought we’d see more people on Redington Road than we did. We ran across a dozen or so souls from a geocaching club who were doing a clean up along the first few miles of the road, a couple of mountain bikers, and a handful of people engaged in target practice. Other than a 4 or five other vehicles, including a Pima County deputy sheriff, we had the entire length of Redington Road to ourselves. The road was in really good shape, save a couple of spots where rain had created small gulleys (maybe 6 inches deep and a foot wide) in the last couple of nights. There were obvious signs that road crews had done some grading and clearing of washes in the last week. The scenery was just stunning. Very green vegetation was abundant, from thick grasses coating the top of the pass to plump saguaro and dark green ocotillo. Wildflowers were everywhere. We made our way along rather slowly, as we stopped along the way to take pictures and check some side roads out. Just below east of Piety Hill we stopped to drink our coffee and devour our donuts. This video is a view to the east with the Galiuro Mountains across the valley

http://youtu.be/oqvQtZobY8A

As we finished the descent into the San Pedro River Valley, we came across a magnificent stand of heritage saguaros that cried out to be photographed. Video:

http://youtu.be/66aUNO9xquc

We wanted to cross the San Pedro at the Redfield Canyon Road.

http://youtu.be/NyO6i6I8L6A

The water was only about 6 inches deep, not swift, and the river bed seemed firm enough, but since we didn’t have a second vehicle to pull us out or any recovery equipment, we crossed further downstream at the bridge. Cascabel Road is in great shape. The valley floor is green and lush. I didn’t expect to see as many residences this far out of Benson as we did. As you would expect, the people we did see reflected the cross section of those you find in rural Arizona – from ranchers to retirees to old hippies to those trying to stay off the grid. Everyone seemed friendly and waved at us, whether from a passing vehicle or from their front gate. Just south of the Spear Ranch I had noted a cemetery on the topo map on the east side of the road. Along this stretch the road was line on both sides by a bosque, which on the east side of the road climbed up a short bluff. I jumped out of the truck and wound my way up the hillside through some brush until I came to a fence about 60 feet off the road. Going through the barbed wire I proceeded another 25 feet until I topped the bluff and wa-lah! there was the graveyard. I had only brought my iPhone up the hill, so I went back to the truck to retrieve my camera and Rob, because he had to see this. As one can see in the photos, besides several modern graves, there are 29 unmarked graves that have to date back to the 1850’s. In a history written by Tess Gamez, of the family that owns the land on which the cemetery sits, it’s not known what year the graveyard was established, or what persons are buried in the 29 unmarked graves.

  • IMG_2281 web IMG_2281 web There was no end to the photographic opportunities, as my buddy Rob will attest to.
  • IMG_2282 web IMG_2282 web Clouds set up some spectacular shots to photograph.
  • IMG_2286 web IMG_2286 web A lone cottonwood guards an old water tank near the top of Reddington Pass.
  • IMG_2293 web IMG_2293 web The top of the pass opens into some large grassland areas.
  • IMG_2298 web IMG_2298 web Mesquite bosques are common throughout Arizona.
  • IMG_2309 web IMG_2309 web We were treated to grand views throughout the trip.
  • IMG_2310 web IMG_2310 web The view as we descended into the San Pedro River Valley.
  • IMG_1845 web IMG_1845 web Looking east towards the Galiuro Mountains.
  • IMG_2314 web IMG_2314 web A magnificient stand of heritage saguaros.
  • IMG_2316 web IMG_2316 web The San Pedro River.
  • IMG_2323 web IMG_2323 web Another bosque.
  • IMG_1846 web IMG_1846 web No trip in Arizona is complete without a snake in the road.
  • IMG_2327 web IMG_2327 web The Gamez family cemetery.
  • IMG_2331 web IMG_2331 web Some of the 29 pioneer graves, occupants unknown.
  • IMG_2339 web IMG_2339 web Railfanning at the Three Bridges area on Marsh Station Road just east of Vail, Arizona.
     

 

We had thought of completing the trip to Benson in about 3 to 4 hours so we could lunch there, but we stopped so often that we found ourselves at the Gamez Cemetery around 1 pm. From there, we left off making any more stops (for the most part), reaching Benson around 3. Rob suggested we eat at the Horseshoe Café. I had never eaten there. Wow, we had quite a meal! While the burgers and sandwiches sounded great, they start serving dinner at 3 on Saturday, so Rob had meatloaf, mashed potatoes, and a salad, while I had liver, bacon, and onions, baked potato, and a salad. The portions were HUGE. Each entrée was only $10. On the way back, we stopped at the Three Bridges area off Marsh Station Road near Vail to photograph a couple of westbound trains we had seen passing through Benson. We finally got back to my house at 5:20 pm, nine hours after we had left.

It was easy to forget within minutes of climbing Reddington Road that a modern city was behind us. Almost immediately we were met with solitude, gorgeous landscapes, and a sense of what Arizona must have looked like when the first European explorers entered the region. For those that live in the region, life is probably pretty much the same as it was 150 years ago – isolated, dependent upon water, neighbors, adaptability, and endurance. Even with Tucson or Benson 40 or 50 miles away, you get a sense that you are a long ways from nowhere.

 

And The Highest Point In Tucson Is…

After years of planning and training, the time had come to tackle one the of peaks on my list – Tucson (City) High Point. After making sure I was provisioned, that my estate was in order, funds in place to cover the cost of a helicopter evac from the summit, and that I had cleared my browser history, I kissed my wife goodbye and set out for the far flung eastern corner of the Tucson corporate limits to make my ascent.

After parking the at the trailhead, the most daunting of obstacles presented itself – barbed wire fencing – damn! I’m in a good pair of jeans. Nonetheless, I was determined to forge ahead. Gently placing a hand upon the top strand, I pushed down and was able to get over without ripping new ventilation into my garments. Ahead I could see the summit. My goal was in sight. Putting one loafer encased foot after another, I deftly made my ascent in almost no time at all – about 1 second. After spending some time on the peak and logging in on the register, I made my way off the mountain to celebrate another peak bagged!

In all seriousness, this high point is listed on peakbagger.com, and is on the list of selected USA Selected City High Points. It is literally at the most far eastern corner of the Tucson corporate boundary. It is also a pimple on the surrounding desert. The high point is located at the northwest corner of the intersection of E Dawn Drive and E Shalom Dr in the Vail area.

The cairn and jar where the summit register is located
Tucson High Point summit register

This trip report was originally published at HikeArizona.com